Race, Health, and Social Equity Committee

Acting For Change

ASNNA’s Race, Health and Social Equity Committee was formed to raise awareness of the inequities in the administration and implementation of SNAP-Ed, acknowledge that these inequities exist and act to change them.

RHSE Committee members represent state agencies and implementing agencies, both in extension and in other types of agencies such as health departments, non-profits, social service organizations and universities. They are from most SNAP-Ed regions and are Black, Asian, Native American, Latinx, multi-racial and white, men and women, with representatives from the following states (up-to-date as of December 2021): Alaska, Arizona, Colorado, Georgia, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Washington and Wisconsin

Co-Chairs of the Committee are:

Latresh Davenport, SNAP Nutrition Education Program Coordinator with the GEORGIA DIVISION OF FAMILY & CHILDREN SERVICES  (Latresh.Davenport@dhs.ga.gov)

Angela Amico, SNAP-Ed Program Manager/ Food Programs and Policy, ESA Community Services Division with this Washington State Department of Social and Health Services (amicoad@dshs.wa.gov)

Resource Clearinghouse

The Race, Health, and Social Equity Committee is developing a set of resources for SNAP-Ed programs related to race, health, and social equity, which will be housed on the updated ASNNA website. This clearinghouse will provide resources, materials, and ideas from SNAP-Ed programs that have implemented explicit equity-based work into different aspects of their program models. We are inviting you to send in materials for possible posting. These include:

  • Training resources you have developed related to equity, anti-racism, or similar topics
  • Land acknowledgment resources
  • SNAP-Ed plan language:
    • Language around professional development/training related to anti-racism, equity, or similar topics
    • Language around culturally responsive programming (including adapting materials, training, or other program elements to be culturally responsive)
    • Language around leveraging SNAP-Ed resources, especially funding, to those most affected by SNAP-Ed programming, such as through engaging SNAP-Ed eligible residents as consultants or advisory committee members, through participatory budgeting processes, or via subawards to local organizations.
    • Language around developing equitable PSE efforts
    • Language around trauma-informed practices
  • Equitable evaluation resources, trainings, and/or processes
  • Other relevant resources that support equity and anti-racism in SNAP-Ed
  • Resources that guide community engagement of those impacted by SNAP-Ed, such as community residents as consultants and/or collaborators on the direction of SNAP-Ed initiatives or programs.

Submissions should come from approved SNAP-Ed Plans.

Note: We will stipulate on the website that any SNAP-Ed plan language be vetted through your State SNAP-Ed Coordinator and/or SNAP-Ed Regional Coordinator prior to implementation. 

If you have any questions, please contact Molly De Marco at molly_demarco@unc.edu. Submit materials here. 

Events

Jan 27, 2022 04:00 to 5:15  PM EST in Eastern Time (US and Canada)

The Role of Racial Equity in SNAP-Ed Part 2: Authentic Resident Engagement as a Model to Advance Equity

Join our hosts, UNC’S SNAP-Ed Toolkit Team and ASNNA’s Race, Health and Social Equity Committee, for a two-part training which will provide an overview of why and how to do authentic resident engagement, followed by a discussion session on applying the four working principles to our SNAP-Ed activities. The Healthy Food Policy Project team and its Advisory Committee members developed working principles to provide a template for authentic resident engagement in food access policy change. On Thursday, January 27, 2022 from 4:00 to 5:15 PM EST, team members Sally Mancini and Whitney Shields will provide an overview of the principles. Dr. Kristen Cooksey Stowers will share examples of how she has used these principles in her food access work in East Hartford, CT. On Monday, January 31 2022 from 3:00 to 4:00 pm, EST ASNNA Race, Health and Social Equity Committee members will facilitate small group discussion on how to operationalize authentic resident engagement in a SNAP-Ed setting. The discussion session will be capped at 200 to allow for small group discussion.Objectives – following this training and it’s discussion session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the four working principles of authentic resident engagement.
  • Give one example of how the working principles have been used in programming to address food access.
  • Share two ideas for how to use the working principles in your SNAP-Ed plan.

Time

Jan 27, 2022 04:00 to 5:15  PM EST in Eastern Time (US and Canada)

Speakers

Dr. Kristen Cooksey Stowers

Dr. Kristen Cooksey Stowers

Assistant Professor at The University of Connecticut

Dr. Kristen Cooksey Stowers is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Allied Health Sciences at the University of Connecticut. With an interdisciplinary background in health equity, agricultural economics, public policy, and medical sociology, her research focuses on reducing inequities in diet-related health outcomes by improving macro and micro level food environments through sustainable policy solutions. Dr. Cooksey Stowers’ research has been funded by the NIH, USDA, Food Trust Center for Healthy Food Access, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and Reinvestment Fund. Her leadership experience includes service with the W.K. Kellogg Foundation and an appointment as a Public Service Leader Scholar with the USDA in Washington, D.C. Since coming to Connecticut in 2016, she has worked with community partners and residents aiming to improve grocery store access in the North Hartford Promise Zone. She also serves as a board member of the Connecticut Food Bank.

Sally Mancini

Sally Mancini

Director of Advocacy Resources at the Rudd Center for Food Policy and Health

Sally Mancini is Director of Advocacy Resources at the Rudd Center for Food Policy and Health, leading efforts to inform the public, community organizations, advocates, and policy makers about the Center’s research. She also helps state and local advocates develop the resources necessary to support food policy improvements in all communities. Sally has more than 15 years of experience in non-profit development and management, advocacy and government relations, and coalition building. Prior to joining the Rudd Center, she coordinated advocacy and public policy campaigns for public health clients and was Assistant Director of End Hunger CT!, a statewide anti-hunger and food security organization.

Whitney Shields

Whitney Shields

Project Manager at the Center for Agriculture and Food System

Whitney Shields is the Project Manager at the Center for Agriculture and Food System at Vermont Law School and the Vermont Legal Food Hub’s Program Coordinator. Previously, Whitney was a litigation paralegal at Langrock Sperry & Wool, where she worked primarily on an environmental case in Southern VT. Whitney hails from New Jersey and earned a BA in Theater and Women and Gender Studies from Montclair State University. She served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Togo, West Africa, where she implemented a food security conference, and organized a reforestation project planting over 300 moringa trees. After the Peace Corps, she developed a documentary theater piece at Genesis Farm in NJ to explore and share the community’s relationship with their Community Supported Garden. During this time, Whitney realized that she wanted to pursue food and agriculture work as a career. Whitney manages the finalization and design process of CAFS’ resources and is the VT Legal Food Hub Program Coordinator.

Jan 31, 2022 03:00 – 4:00 PM EST in Eastern Time (US and Canada)

The Role of Racial Equity in SNAP-Ed Part 2: Authentic Resident Engagement as a model to advance equity – Discussion

Join our hosts, UNC’S SNAP-Ed Toolkit Team and ASNNA’s Race, Health and Social Equity Committee, for a facilitated small group discussion on how to operationalize authentic resident engagement in a SNAP-Ed setting. This webinar is a continuation of information presented at January 27th’s session, and will be capped at 200 to allow for small group discussion.Objectives – following this discussion session, participants will be able to

  • Describe the four working principles of authentic resident engagement.
  • Give one example of how the working principles have been used in programming to address food access.
  • Share two ideas for how to use the working principles in your SNAP-Ed plan.
  • Time

    Jan 31, 2022 03:00 – 4:00 PM EST in Eastern Time (US and Canada)

    Equity Statement

    ASNNA Statement Release

    ASNNA Statement on Racial Equity

    Systemic racism unfairly advantages one group while unfairly disadvantaging other groups. In the U.S., this systemic racism has resulted in both unjust food systems and unjust economic systems. ASNNA looks to organize and create opportunities for learning, while sharing and exploring information about race, health, and social equity to carry out SNAP-Ed-funded work to advance health equity.

    Action Plan

    2021

    Subcommittess

    • Clearinghouse
    • Call to Action
    • Civil Rights Training
    • Position Paper/Recommendations

    Statements

    2021

    USDA Advancing Racial Equity Comments

    The Association of SNAP Nutrition Education Administrators (ASNNA) appreciates the opportunity to comment and provide recommendations to USDA to advance racial justice and equity for underserved communities. The comments were developed by our Race, Health and Social Equity Committee. 

    Resources

    2021 Conference Plenary Session Slides

    Learning Objectives

    • Recognize the importance of addressing racial and social equity
    • Describe ways to address equity in current SNAP-Ed programming
    • Increase self-efficacy in communicating about equity
    • Build understanding of how to create an action plan to address equity
    • Increase knowledge of what is currently being done to address race and equity

    Racial Equity Town Hall Summary Slides

    Breakout Room Topics

    • What is SNAP-Ed’s role in building equity?
    • What can the ASNNA RHSE committee do to help us all educate ourselves around these topics?
    • What is already being done at your program/organization to address race, health, social equity issues?
    • What are the top 3 action items the ASNNA RHSE committee can take within this fiscal year to help you/your program or organization?
    • What is one thing that you can do in your current SNAP-Ed work and role around equity?

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